Expert Take: How to Create Cohesive Social Ads

Advertisers shouldn’t let other advertisers have ugly ads. There, I said it.

These days, a beautiful ad – one that really knocks your socks off – shouldn’t be hard to come by, one would think. With the abundance of tips, tricks, and even courses on how to create best practice ads, many fall short and feel like they’re just missing that “thing.” I think we can all agree that a non-cohesive ad comes off as a hot mess of unrelated imagery, poor copy, and inaccurate or conflicting calls-to-action.

So, why does this happen? In most cases, I’ve found that advertisers want their ads to say something specific. They want their headline to be their name, their body to say something about their offer, and they may or may not even utilize the link description real estate. When it comes to imagery, it can run the gamut – from custom imagery suitable for advertising to stock imagery that’s cold and has nothing to do with the campaign.

Of course, when your hands are tied and an advertiser makes a requirement, the ads you publish on their behalf may not be up to your standards. There’s not much you can do other than provide support where you can. In these cases, I believe it’s best to drive monthly conversations about improvement and change bits of the campaign here and there when you can. Eventually, you’ll get what you want, and they’ll be even happier.

When you are in charge of content creation, be smart. Everything should come together in a harmonious way:

  • Copy should reflect the offers and business goals of the campaign. Remember the headline should hook users in and drive them headfirst into your goal. Imagery should accurately reflect the above copy.
  • Using custom imagery is always preferred, where possible. If there’s text or symbols in your image, make sure it’s in the correct language for your audience.
  • Call-to-Action buttons should also reflect the copy. If the button says “Call Now,” users expect a direct dial upon click, not to be sent to a website.
  • Bonus: Lead Forms should reflect the ad’s offer. Qualifying questions should ask questions related to the offer, and any messaging should tie back to the copy.

Just remember – you wouldn’t leave your house in a mismatched outfit, right? Don’t be that advertiser and think before you publish.

Want to learn more about best practice Facebook Advertising? Explore our resources. 

Analissa Moreno supports Tiger Pistol’s Value Added Reseller social advertising team by managing fulfillment for the Spanish-speaking portion of the portfolio, providing obscure Facebook and Tiger Pistol product knowledge to her teammates, and diving into new reporting projects across the business. Tiger Pistol  creates, deploys, manages, and optimizes high-performance Facebook and Instagram ads at unprecedented scale for global brands, SMB resellers, and agencies that serve multi-location brands.

Playbook: Social Advertising at Scale for Multi-location Brands

While some major platforms have begun to offer advertising objectives that align with local needs such as calls or visits, none come close to the easy, effective tools Tiger Pistol provides to activate and manage your multi-location brand’s social advertising at scale.

Unlocking Local Activation at Scale is the social advertising playbook that reveals just how simple and efficient Tiger Pistol’s social advertising platform makes it for multi-location brands to onboard and empower their local stores or channel partners with brand-approved, best practice, Facebook and Instagram campaigns — all customized for their local audiences.

Ready to streamline your time to results?

SMB Resellers and Agencies: How to Make the Most of the Conversions Objective

Whether you’re an agency or an SMB reseller that delivers ads for small businesses, you’ve probably heard about Facebook’s Conversion Marketing Objective. Perhaps you have been wary of trying it out, or maybe you’ve tried it and found yourself navigating the difficult choice of what exact type of conversion to optimize for. In either case, Facebook’s Conversion and Attribution measurement tools have received numerous additions and refinements over the last few years, and the value advertisers derive from these improvements has specifically sparked popularity for the Conversions Campaign Objective, which optimizes the delivery of your Facebook Campaign specifically towards a conversion event, rather than say, a website click or person reached. 

ROI is, of course, the ultimate goal of any advertising effort, so one might naturally ask, “Why would I ever choose an objective that’s not conversion optimized?”, or even “Why would I choose to optimize towards anything but purchase conversions?” It turns out the latter is the more complicated question, but one you can answer when armed with the right information. It all has to do with how Facebook’s ad bidding works, which involves a combination of factors: your advertiser bid, estimated action rates (i.e. how your target audience responds to the ad), and overall ad quality. As Facebook notes, “together, estimated action rates and ad quality measure ad relevance. In fact, we subsidize relevant ads in auctions, so more relevant ads often cost less and see more results.”

Let’s think about what this means in the conversions context, using a simple example of a local golf supply shop with an online store on their website. Naturally, they want to move as much product as possible, and focus their targeting efforts on people interested in golf. So they set up a Conversions Objective Campaign targeting people interested in golf. Let’s set aside for a moment the question of which conversion event they should choose. Instead, let’s first illustrate how optimization works between the Facebook objective and target audience:

Breaking this equation down, first we have our target audience, a combination of the golf store’s sales area and customer base, or simply “people interested in golf.” A lot of people on Facebook are likely interested in golf products, but only some of them probably use, buy, or browse products regularly. This is where Facebook’s optimization comes in to help, as it tries to identify those users in the pool of people “interested in golf products” who are likely to take the chosen action of the Facebook objective. 

In this example, we have chosen the Conversions Objective, so you can think of it as a hierarchy. We want people interested in golf, who are likely to convert. Another way of thinking about it is this results in a smaller pool of users that becomes our “real” or ideal target audience – the “convertors” among those interested in golf. This leads us nicely back to the question of the conversion action to optimize for, as this will modify who Facebook identifies as the most likely to take the conversion action in the “convertors” group. 

Facebook’s own provided guidance on the matter is as follows: “We recommend optimizing for a conversion that occurs at least 100 times per month without running any ads. If your website doesn’t get at least that many conversions without ads, it’s very unlikely that we’ll be able to find enough converters through ads for your ad set to be successful.” Additionally, they also note that purchases are the “rarest type of conversion” Or perhaps, more precisely said, typically the most expensive type of conversion.

In the end, it all boils down to Pixel data and which actions can be tracked on your website through the Pixel. Facebook’s guidance recommends that you should only consider the Conversions Objective if you have a history of 100 Pixel fires on “page view,” “add to cart,” and similar type events. This context helps us in selecting conversion events, but what about the strategic decisions, especially for an SMB who has a more limited advertising budget?

The key is to adapt and learn. For an SMB with website traffic in the low thousands per month, you likely won’t have enough purchase actions tracked on specific products to reliably optimize “purchase” events right of the gate, and you may find that even if you do, it’s still not as cost effective as optimizing toward more common conversion events, like “view content,” “add to cart,” or “add to wishlist.” For example, “add to cart” instead tells Facebook to look for users in the “interested in golf convertors” pool who are showing purchase-intent behavior, as opposed to verifiable conversions, like “purchases.” Remember, there are always going to be less purchasers relative to more common conversion events, unless of course your business’ conversion rate is 100% (wouldn’t that be nice?).

When optimizing towards people showing purchase intent, you are potentially gaining more cost effective targeting, as those users will be easier to reach, because, of course, these are not exacting parameters. Maybe I, for example, viewed a golf product on a big box store’s website and opted not to buy the product after adding it to my cart. Perhaps, I simply forgot to checkout or changed my mind at the last minute. The Facebook Pixel captures this behavior and recognizes me as one of the users showing purchase intent on golf products. Maybe when I see an ad for the SMB golf store, I like the price or the quality better, and opt to purchase from them immediately. The golf store just got a lower cost conversion by optimizing towards purchase intent. 

The possibilities are infinite, but it is important to keep in mind how Facebook’s optimization and objectives work when making these decisions. There is never going to be a “one size fits” all approach when it comes to choosing the right conversion event to optimize for, but through smart data analysis and guided testing, you can make the Conversions Objective work for just about any business with a website with a bit of traffic. 

Learn how Tiger Pistol puts the Conversion Objective to work at scale. Request a Demo Today!

Chris Mayer, a Solutions Engineer at Tiger Pistol, specializes in helping digital agencies, SMB resellers, and global brands build scaled Facebook advertising solutions with an emphasis on local activation. 

An Advertisers’ Guide to Facebook Stories (and How to Leverage Them at Scale!)

The way we share information constantly evolves, and, as advertisers, we’re always looking for fun, fast ways to tell our story and promote our business. Facebook’s standard placements are proven drivers of user engagement and great business results, but the social platform’s latest offering, Facebook Stories, offers prime real estate for your advertisement.

Facebook Stories bring your ads to life, and it’s easy to see why they secure more than 300 million users’ attention every day. Shown front and center on a user’s news feed, Stories are likely the first thing users see upon login. One tap accesses a user’s Stories Feed, and subsequent taps scroll through their friends’ stories. Stories ads are sprinkled throughout this feed, generating views and allowing in-feed engagement as they move from one Story to the next. The mechanism of accessing Stories creates a captive atmosphere for the ads to appear within, increasing a business’ potential reach to a larger and more diverse audience.

As Advertisers, why should we care?

With their full-screen creative format, Stories engage mobile audiences on a different level than in-feed ads. Mobile advertising is essential to driving brand recognition and determining campaign effectiveness, and advertising in stories has proven to drive valuable business outcomes. According to research by Ipsos, a global market research and consulting firm:

  • 62% of people said they became more interested in a brand or product after seeing it in a Story.
  • 68% of people polled said they use Stories on at least three apps regularly.
  • 63% said they plan to use Stories more in the future.

What are the Elements of a Successful Stories Advertisement?

  • Begin With Your Brand – Introduce yourself at the beginning of the creative and remind users who you are.
  • Keep Attention with Speed – It’s important to remember things move fast in stories, so make sure to deliver your message and showcase your brand quickly, we recommend within the first 5 seconds.
  • Creative is Important – Creative is a key factor in driving campaign effectiveness and must align with your business goals and objectives. Define your strategy and align your creative elements to support.
  • Enhance Your Story with Sound – Music can help enhance your message for your brand.
  • Design with Your Objective in Mind – Tailor the creative of your ad to the objective and ask yourself, what are you looking to achieve?
  • Test and Learn – Experimenting with creativity on stories will help identify what strategies work for your audiences, creative, and business objectives.
Leveraging Facebook Stories at Scale 

When it comes to localizing ads at scale, the Stories ad placement should not be ignored. Whether using localized dynamic video ads or static creative, advertisers can still reap the benefits of Facebook Stories’ unique real estate, mobile optimization, and captive elements within the Facebook Newsfeed. What’s more, localized story ads published from local Pages give you the opportunity to direct consumers exactly where to buy your company’s products or access your services at a location most relevant to them.

Localized stories ads give users a method to directly respond to an ad, whether getting a quote from a local agent or receiving turn-by-turn driving directions to a restaurant near them. 

Ready to see how you can advertise with Facebook Stories at scale?  Contact us today!

 

Amy Abell is a Client Manager at Tiger Pistol, where she specializes in supporting our Value-Added Resellers portfolio. When she’s not in the office, she enjoys walks on Austin’s Town Lake with her dog Finley, traveling to new places, and trying every new restaurant in town.

 

 

 

CHECKLIST: Avoiding Bogus Leads from Facebook Ads

“Leave me alone.”
“I’m not interested.”
“Who are you?”

Like a discordant refrain, these familiar phrases can feel like they’re playing on loop when following up with potential customers generated from Facebook Lead Ads. Bogus or misleading leads are a huge complaint among advertisers, but there are a few common and useful steps an advertiser can take when building Lead Generation Ad Campaigns to curb the occurrence of false leads.

Certain aspects are out of our control from the advertisers’ end, such as trusting Facebook users to enter correct and non-misleading information, but armed with this handy checklist, you can audit your lead gen ads, making improvements to stem the tide.

☐ Add additional qualifying questions

When trying to differentiate between the good, the bad, and the ugly, especially when it comes to your leads, adding an extra layer of protection goes a long way. One of the best and most highly recommended steps would be to add qualifying questions to your lead form. This helps ensure that the Facebook users who are responding to your ads are doing so in good faith, helping you easily separate leads who appear to have an actual interest in your product or service from leads that are clearly bots and window shoppers.

☐ Provide several responses a user can select from

This step ties directly into the first tip we just discussed, “adding additional qualifying questions.” By giving users a checklist of preset answers to select from when responding to your qualifying questions, you can help yourself later on down the road as you filter and prioritize leads who have shown interest but might not be ready to, “pull the trigger,” or for that matter, “load the gun.” Here’s what prefilled options could look like on a real estate lead gen ad form:

☐ Optimize your ad copy

Consider your ad copy your first line of defense against users who might just be “clicking to click” out of sheer curiosity.  Clear messaging that calls out variables like cost, location, or time-sensitive offerings can help ward away non-buyers and bots alike, instead drawing in serious prospects who you’d want to follow-up with.

☐ Narrow Your Target Audience Focus

Reduce your bogus lead rate with better targeting through lookalike audiences. This robust tool in Facebook’s advertising apparatus can help you help yourself right out of the gate.  Being able to hone in on the audience for your ad campaign clears the cobwebs before they’ve even been spun. Using your existing customer base and then generating a lookalike audience based on that list can focus in on Facebook users who are most likely to turn into offline conversions.

☐ Lead Follow-Up

While not pertaining directly to the ad structure, proper follow-up is one of the most critical and overlooked steps of all. Delays in outreach can cause users to rethink (or even forget) their interest in the product or service being offered. Rapid response to your ad’s hand-raisers can be the catalyst that propels an opportunity forward or severs the relationship forever.  The sooner you follow-up, the more likely a user’s attention stays focused, allowing you to gain valuable insight and build the relationship necessary to move the conversation along towards an offline sale.

Facebook’s release of Lead Generation Ads in October 2015 changed the game for advertisers who use their platform, and since launch, a number of best practices for Facebook Lead Gen Ads have surfaced. Having users within the targeted audience provide detailed information such as, a name, a phone number, as well as an email address greatly increases the seller’s ability to, “cut the fat,” so to speak, and focus their time on outreach to those who have expressed interest directly rather than just counting on data collected after a campaign has concluded. By following the steps outlined above, you won’t just be “cutting the fat,” but providing yourself with the leanest, meanest Lead Gen Campaigns out there.

Ready to learn more about running quality lead generation ads at scale?  Contact us today!

Justin Chavolla is a client success specialist for Tiger Pistol.  Originally from the San Francisco Bay Area, he moved to Austin 4 years ago. Justin takes his passion for helping others and couples it with his constant curiosity of figuring out how things work. He brings his enthusiasm to Tiger Pistol, where he is able to help our clients succeed and better understand the platform.  As an avid fan of combat sports, when he is not at work you can catch him at the local boxing gym constantly trying to improve his skills.

How to Localize Social Ad Creative for Your Restaurant Brand

Recently, I published an article discussing the impact of running local social ads from local restaurant franchise pages. In it, I focused heavily on direct response calls-to-action, which may have left you asking, what about localized creative? That’s a fair point. It’s not enough to deliver the ad locally; the ad needs to feel local as well. Let’s look at how this can be accomplished through scaled social advertising – with dynamic campaign creative to fit your franchisee’s local flavor. 

Creative that’s On-Brand, Every Time

Risks like brand dilution make it challenging to relinquish control of creative at the local level. Tiger Pistol’s solution gives brands control of social advertising creative and messaging through templatized campaigns, alleviating brand-level worries about foibles at the local level. Tiger Pistol creates templates for your campaigns in single image, video, and carousel formats, ensuring all your creative is on-brand. Locations and franchise partners win with the flexibility to choose the right creative, offers, and messaging for their market.Brands win by gaining control through our predefined framework and the ability to publish ads to franchise and location pages at scale. What’s more, all campaigns run in A/B tests, auto-optimizing to the winner, and reporting is available at the brand and local levels. 

Best-practice Localized Social Ad Creative for Restaurants

You eat with your eyes first, so your creative should draw diners in with high quality images of your restaurant, food, or drinks. To entice diners and drive the desire to visit your establishment, consider the following best-practices for restaurant creative assets. 

  • Optimize your images for mobile.  Most social scrollers orient their devices vertically, so be sure you’re cropping correctly. 
  • Match the creative to your brand. If your restaurant is airy and bright, don’t use photos that are dark and hard to see. 
  • Don’t just highlight your food. Enhance your local messaging with news of events, awards, and unique aspects of your restaurants, such as locally sourced/sustainable. 

Users want to feel engaged with your brand, and Tiger Pistol’s social advertising platform offers effective, localized social advertising to drive business and build loyalty, increasing the frequency of customer visits by serving social ads at the right time and right place to build your brand, share offers, and launch new locations. 

Request a demo today to see how Tiger Pistol makes it simple to distribute brand campaigns that can be locally edited and funded by your franchisees or locations. 

Jarrod Hitt is a Marketing Services Manager for Tiger Pistol. He specializes in helping national brands build scaled Facebook advertising solutions with an emphasis on local activation. Jarrod holds a marketing degree from the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee. Outside the office, he enjoys spending time outdoors with his wife and dog, fly-fishing, skiing, mountain biking, and practicing his photography. 

What's Up with WhatsApp Ads

What’s Up With WhatApp Ads?

WhatsApp ads are coming! Well actually, they’re already here, but they are expected to be coming again in 2020, only this time, in-app. It was only just over a year ago, in October of 2018, that Facebook enabled “click to WhatsApp” ads, which allowed marketers to deploy ads that allowed users to click direct into a WhatsApp conversation with a business. These features further evolved into the concept of “WhatsApp Business” – a separate app specifically for business owners using WhatsApp, that launched in April 2019.

Facebook’s development of their WhatsApp advertising offerings has been a slow burn since they acquired the Platform in 2014. Generally speaking, up until recently, WhatsApp was treated more independently of Facebook’s other major acquired property, Instagram. Instagram fully opened to advertisers in 2015, just 3 years after being acquired.

WhatsApp Business includes the ability to set up Business Profiles on WhatsApp as well as more distinct tools for business communication, such as auto-responses, and away messages. These WhatsApp changes are foundational, and a necessary step to fully unlock the advertising potential of the WhatsApp platform, with the expected launch of new ad formats that originate in WhatsApp, rather than taking users to it. It’s clear that Facebook likely has bigger plans for WhatsApp in mind.

Investing in WhatsApp’s advertising functionality is a no-brainer for Facebook, by the numbers, WhatsApp represents one of their largest, most engaged properties:

  • 1 billion WhatsApp accounts are active every day.
  • 1.5 billion WhatsApp accounts are active every month
  • 2 billion minutes of calls every day.
  • 450 million WhatsApp accounts are active on WhatsApp Status every day.

With such a massive user base using the Platform regularly, WhatsApp promises to be the next evolution of Facebook’s social advertising tools. However, though it should be mentioned, there is just one major caveat to the rise of WhatsApp, Facebook’s home market, the United States, doesn’t really use it. Facebook’s answer to this, has been to position Messenger as the go-to messaging option for advertisers in the US. In either case, WhatsApp’s emergence is a sign of the times. Messaging is to become a bigger part of the consumer experience and advertisers will be required to evolve to meet this new challenge, and we have every reason to believe that WhatsApp will be the first battleground.

What opportunity does WhatsApp represent? Better consumer data and experiences namely, in addition to considerable ROI potential for businesses large and small. A few examples from Facebook on early adopters:

PlayKids,  an education Platform for kids, saw a 90% decrease in lapsed subscribers when they started using WhatsApp Business to communicate directly with their customers over phone and email.

Sale Stock, an Indonesian fashion business, took a similar approach and began using WhatsApp Business as their primary communication channel. It quickly became their number one source of inbound chat traffic, with 90% of the messages delivered by Sale Stock read by their customers.

What makes WhatsApp and messaging-based social activations so exciting is their ability to generate both positive customer outcomes in addition to ROI for the business. This is especially true at scale. One additional case study comes from the Dubai-based logistics company Aramex. To date they’ve served over one million customers through WhatsApp Business, and saw a 19% decrease in inbound call volume to their support center since making the transition. What’s more, 41% of all shipment inquiries are now handled through WhatsApp.

One thing these case studies all have in common is they all involve integrating WhatsApp into customer service channels – the advertising elements only surfacing in the very bottom funnel, where messaging is deployed to drive retention and re-purchase. In part, this is not unexpected given that it’s much easier for businesses to communicate with existing customers rather than potential ones through direct messaging. To think that messaging could lead a customer acquisition strategy is a notion fraught with caveat and complication. While it may not ever be the leading strategy for some industries, it can be a compelling strategic element even in cases where proactive conversation is not already embedded in the sales process.

Imagine running an awareness or traffic campaign in WhatsApp, and retargeting people who viewed the ads, watched X% of the video, or viewed a product page with a direct message. Alternatively, immediate follow-ups off the back of WhatsApp ad clicks present another interesting frame, to instigate driving conversions via direct or bot-driven consumer communication. The possibilities are endless, but it can’t happen until Facebook’s tools catch up.

In the last year, Facebook has made the foundational steps for both WhatsApp and Messenger to play a larger role in advertising. The next step is a fuller integration with existing advertising tools by launching WhatsApp Ad formats with direct placement on WhatsApp and lowering the barrier of entry for advertisers.

I suspect 2020 may finally be that year where messaging as a distinct tactic, rather than an afterthought, within the Facebook marketing funnel will be fully realized. And soon our notion of a “social media campaign” might just change a bit to not only include targeting consumers on social media, but talking to them as well. Who knows, you may even find yourself reporting on “Conversations Started” in between discussing impressions and CPCs.

Ready to simplify social advertising, and enable local activation at global scale? Contact Tiger Pistol today.

After earning his Masters in Mass Communications in 2015, Chris Mayer worked at Facebook prior to joining Tiger Pistol as a Project Manager. He specializes in helping digital agencies and national brands build scaled Facebook advertising solutions with an emphasis on local activation. Outside the office, he enjoys, basketball, Formula One, and sharing opinions on film and television.

Infographic: Facebook Advertising Best Practices to Drive Leads

Your business needs leads, and one of the best ways to fill your pipeline is through Facebook advertising. Get caught up on Facebook Advertising Best Practices for Lead Generation with this handy infographic.

Ready to scale your social advertising and drive leads to your locations? Contact Tiger Pistol today.

Checklist Avoiding the Common Pitfalls That Can Cause Your Facebook Ad to Underperform

Checklist: Avoiding the Common Pitfalls That Can Cause Your Facebook Ad to Underperform

Running Facebook ads can be tricky business, and it really doesn’t take much for your ad to get bitten by the underperformance bug. Here’s a checklist of common problems, coupled with ways to adjust your ads to ensure they are running correctly. 

PROBLEM: Ad is not approved Sometimes the issue isn’t the ad, but rather its delivery. Luckily this can be an easy fix, so here are some tips to make sure delivery and performance are not related. 

  • Make sure it complies with Facebook policyFacebook policy is something a lot of advertisers struggle with, and if you are a busy advertiser with a lot of notifications; you may not notice your ad has been disabled due to a policy violation. Facebook also has the ability to retroactively reject ads, so we highly recommend checking the ad’s status and making the proper updates. Also, be aware of which policy violation may be affecting your ad and see if it is a valid disapproval. Facebook isn’t perfect and may wrongfully flag the ad. 

Check out these past blogs on Facebook policy changes to ensure you’re in compliance: 

Revamping Your Strategy and Audiences for the Latest “Safe & Civil” Facebook Advertising Update

Decision 2020: Changes to Facebook’s Social & Political Ads Process

Keep Your Agents Compliant: Facebook’s New Rules for Real Estate Ads

  • The 20% text rule Originally, Facebook often disapproved ads with images that contained more than 20% text (logos included) because it interferes with the user experience. Now Facebook will approve a lot of these ads but limit their reach. Save the text for your headline, body, and link description. That is what they are there for! Use eye-catching and custom creative to attract viewers. Facebook offers a useful image text tool to verify your ad follows this rule. 

PROBLEM: Targeting – Targeting largely impacts how your ads are performing, and we want to make sure you find the sweet spot to help your ads succeed. If your ad is underperforming, consider tweaking the audience. Audiences that are too hyper-focused or extremely broad tend to impede results. At Tiger Pistol, we recommend an audience of at least 50,000 to run a successful ad. Here’s some specifics to consider: 

  • Audience Too Broad –  Don’t use your budget on impressions that don’t matter. We have found local advertising to be extremely successful when concentrating on those who will take action and support your business. Think about who and where your customers are. If you are a local coffee shop, most people won’t drive more than 10 miles for their latte. Target strategically and think critically about your customers.
  • Audience Too Narrow – Narrowing your focus may cause you to miss some opportunities. Consider these tips to expand your audience to reach new customers and increase sales or engagement. If they are your ideal audience, chances are your competitors’ will try to target them as well. Also make sure to remove unnecessary targeting parameters and restrictions, like demographic and detailed targeting options that both reduce your audience size to under 50,000 and aren’t helping your ad. You may be certain no one over 35 will buy your product, but is there data to prove that? Often narrow audiences are the result of assumptions. Opening up your targeting and letting Facebook’s optimization worry about serving ads can likely result in higher quality ads. If you need assistance with your audience, the Facebook Pixel is a simple and direct way for you to build audiences with first-party data – i.e. your own web traffic. Learn more about how you can harness the Power of the Facebook Pixel!

PROBLEM: Creative – Both your words and your pictures impact your ad rank, so beat out your competitors by showing and telling your audience what makes your business unique. 

  • Does it Fit Your Objective and Audience? Make sure you are targeting your audience with engaging and eye catching images! 96% of users are looking at content on their phones, so you want to optimize for mobile. We have also found that with text, less is more. Great ads present their information in a succinct way with a clear call to action.

  • Check Your Image Resolution A blurry or distorted image will not capture the response you are looking for. Make sure to use high quality images that are related to your business. Using tools like carousels or video creative can help give viewers fresh and exciting content! Find some businesses that inspire you and find out what draws you in about their creative. 

Facebook ads are a complicated mix of traditional advertising creative and digital best practices. All of these different elements must come together to build a unified ad unit. Audiences need to be relevant and made up of interested consumers, just as the creative needs to be compliant and resonate with said consumers. So pay attention to the construction of your audience, the quality of your content you serve them, and most importantly –  when in doubt test it out – especially if you’ve eliminated any technical issues or simple fixes, such as removing text from your image. Here at Tiger Pistol, our platform is designed for continuous A/B testing, automatically pushing winning ads forward and surfacing insights on particular elements such as image, copy, audience, and even down to the CTA button. Harnessing the power of social requires both a trained eye to both develop and manage the right content, but also requires the ability to adapt based on consumer behavior and campaign data. You too can conquer all elements of your social media campaign; it just takes the right mix of proactive action and smart data insights.

Learn how Tiger Pistol can optimize the performance of your local ads at scale. Request a demo today!

Yanira Durant is a marketing specialist for Tiger Pistol. An Austin local with a passion for social advertising, Yanira strives to break through the noise in fun and creative ways. In her free time, she enjoys exploring the city, trying great queso, and managing her pug’s Instagram account.

Facebook Pixel Uses and Best Practices

The Facebook Pixel | Uses & Best Practices

According to Facebook, “The Facebook Pixel is an analytics tool that allows you to measure the effectiveness of your advertising by understanding the actions people take on your website.”

But what does that really mean?

The Facebook Pixel is a piece of code added to a website that tracks user data through cookies, allowing you to access useful analytics about customer website behavior. This data can then be used to inform strategy and find new potential audiences. Here are just a few concrete ways the Pixel helps advertisers: 

  1. You can now show social ads specifically to people who visited your website.
  2. You use your website visitors to build a Lookalike Audience to find and target new customers that have similar interests/behaviors/demographics as your current ones.
  3. You can utilize more more Facebook optimizations, such as Landing Page Views.

The Facebook Pixel is like a net that catches all user activity (referred to as events) and allows marketers to use these events to optimize and create more powerful ads. Facebook has seventeen standard events set up, such as  ‘Add to Wishlist,’ or ‘Complete Registration. ’ Custom events also allow users to add input their own categories.

This has clear and instant appeal for e-commerce, but the Pixel offers unique opportunities for all advertisers. The Pixel also gives retailers the chance to create custom audiences that can be useful in re-marketing efforts. Additionally, Pixel data can also be used at scale with the ability to share information across SMBs or rolled up into corporate systems. This way, brands can use location level data to help form more targeted audiences. 

The Pixel also offers the ability to create Lookalike Audiences from custom audiences. This creates a brand new audience which mirrors the preferences and values of the original. In “The Power of the Facebook Pixel,” Chris Mayer writes how Lookalike audiences are a great way to find new customers without relying on dwindling 3rd party data:

The lookalike process is anonymized: you won’t know exactly what traits the hash aggregates, but that’s okay. The resulting Lookalike Audience generated will include users with similar characteristics whom have not yet visited the website.

Clothing company Wren + Glory used value-based, international lookalike audiences on Facebook and Instagram to expand the company’s sales outside of the US.  They received 62% more orders compared to the previous period. 

In a world where data is crucial, the Pixel helps establish clear results. In fact, Gold’s Gym used data from their Facebook Pixel to learn that their recent Facebook ads produced a 2.2X lift in free trial sign-ups. Geoff Tobey, their Director of Digital Media mentioned that by “being able to jump into a Facebook testing opportunity, we learned that ads in Messenger Stories were more successful in driving an incremental lift in leads, and lowering cost per conversion, than we’ve seen on other channels.”

Whether you’re looking to test new optimizations, employ re-marketing strategies, or find new customers, social media advertising allows customization and proven results. The holidays may be a whirlwind, but the Pixel can help you stay on track along the way. 

Learn more about Facebook Advertising Best Practices from Tiger Pistol’s experts. Browse our resources now.